"Silver Lining," Don’t Shoot the Pianist.

"Silver Lining," Don’t Shoot the Pianist.

19 April 2014 ·

Brahms
16 Waltzes, Op. 39 (four hands)
Nº 6, 5, 12, 2, 1, 14, 10, 6 bis

Nadia Boulanger and Dino Lupatti, piano
(1937)

19 April 2014 ·

"The violin section is divided in to the First Violins, who have the trickier parts to play, and the Second Violins, who are more fun at parties"

~

Lemony Snicket

from “The Composer is Dead”

(via lemonysmiley)

(via sassygayklavierspieler)

18 April 2014 ·

J. S. Bach
Christ lag in Todesbanden, BWV 4
Versus I: “Christ lag in Todesbanden

Münchener Bach Chor und Orchester
Karl Richter

18 April 2014 ·

J. S. Bach
Matthauspassion BWV 244
So ist mein Jesus nun gefangen / Sind Blitzen, sind Donner

Gundula Janowitz, Christa Ludwig
Chor der Deutschen Oper Berlin
Wiener Singverein
Berliner Philharmoniker
Herbert von Karajan

18 April 2014 ·

"[…] Why was the class of “concords” thus limited to just these three basic intervals- the fourth, fifth, and octave? The answer to this question involves what the Pythagoreans called the “tetraktys (or quaternary) of the decad”, the geometric or “figurate” representation of the number 10 as the sum of the first four integers (i.e. 1 2 3 4=10) […] The purely musical significance of this “tetraktys of the decad” resides in the fact that the string-length ratios for the fourth, fifth, octave, twelfth (but not the eleventh) and double octave involve only these first four integers (i.e. 4/3, 3/2, 2/1, 3/1, 4/1, but not 8/3). But the decad had significance for the Pythagoreans that went far beyond this musical application. According to a later Pythagorean, Theon of Smyrna, “The importance of the quaternary… is great in music because of the consonances are found in it. But it is not only for this reason that all Pythagoreans hold it in highest esteem: it is also because it seems to outline the entire nature of the universe. It is for this reason that the formula of their oath was: “I swear by the one who has bestowed the tetraktys to the coming generations, source of eternal nature, into our souls."

~ A History of “Consonance” and “Dissonance” (1988), James Tenney. pp. 12-13 (via imaginarydances)

18 April 2014 ·

"Then the writing became so fluid that I sometimes felt as if I were writing for the sheer pleasure of telling a story, which may be the human condition that most resembles levitation."

~ Gabriel García Márquez
(1927 - 2014)

18 April 2014 ·

de-es-ce-ha:

Maxim Shostakovich

(via thebrokenlyre)

17 April 2014 ·

106 plays

Doc Watson
"Sweet Georgia Brown"
from Southbound (1966, Vanguard)

[Grandma Moses | My Homeland (det.)]

16 April 2014 ·

Marco Monetti"Piper at the Gates of Dawn"

Marco Monetti
"Piper at the Gates of Dawn"

(Source: Flickr / marcomonetti)

16 April 2014 ·

J. S. Bach
French Suite Nº 5 in G, BWV 816
Gigue

Marc-André Hamelin

16 April 2014 ·

classicalconditioning:

This spring’s fashion: reverse cello-playing. You got this, Vogue.

classicalconditioning:

This spring’s fashion: reverse cello-playing. You got this, Vogue.

16 April 2014 ·

178

Whenever Mozart wrote pizz. or arco he would follow it with a little colon, like pizz: or coll’arco: and I think that’s weirdly adorable.

15 April 2014 ·

Granados
Allegro de concierto, Op. 46

Thomas Rajna

15 April 2014 ·

42

Enjoying an awful litany of terrible thoughts on graduate school this frigid, blustery morning, including such specious favorites as:

  • I’m nowhere near good enough for graduate school
  • Is there really any point to graduate school
  • Is graduate school just a technocrat factory, because sometimes in looking around I sure do get that feeling
  • But in my field is there any possibility of job security without it
  • Or is that just a substitute for lack of resourcefulness
  • Uprooting and transplanting: disaster waiting to happen
  • Would I be happier just opening a coffee shop
  • Also I wish I were about 8 years younger

15 April 2014 ·

Curtis Lindsay
Pianist, composer,
expert in nonsense.



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