natgeofound:

Tourists admire the beauty and size of the Washington Monument, April 1935.Photograph by Jacob J. Gayer, National Geographic

—-
1935: Photographer Jacob J. Gayer captures fountains gushing their contents over a rainbow while the colossal phallic symbol which dominates the nation’s capital looks on
2013: Government still can’t decide how it feels about legal rights for same-sex couples

natgeofound:

Tourists admire the beauty and size of the Washington Monument, April 1935.
Photograph by Jacob J. Gayer, National Geographic

—-

1935: Photographer Jacob J. Gayer captures fountains gushing their contents over a rainbow while the colossal phallic symbol which dominates the nation’s capital looks on

2013: Government still can’t decide how it feels about legal rights for same-sex couples

(via tierradentro)

28 March 2013 ·

"The ongoing psychopathic hatred of same-sexuality has made the United States the laughingstock of the civilised world. In most of the First World, monotheism is weak. Where it is weak or nonexistent, private sexual behaviour has nothing to do at all with those not involved, much less the law. At least when the Emperor Justinian, a sky-god man, decided to outlaw sodomy, he had to come up with a good practical reason, which he did. It is well known, Justinian declared, that buggery is a principal cause of earthquakes, and so must be prohibited. But our sky-godders, always eager to hate, still quote Leviticus, as if that looney text had anything useful to say about anything except, perhaps, the inadvisability of eating shellfish in the Jerusalem area."

~

Gore Vidal
Lowell Lecture, Harvard University,
April 1992 

2 August 2012 ·

Lesbians with boats: heroic couple saved 40 swimmers in Utoeya tragedy

redofromstart:

A married lesbian couple saved 40 kids the day Anders Behring Breivik killed 76 people in a combined bombing and shooting attack in Norway, reports Finnish newspaper Helsingin Sanomat. Hege Dalen and Toril Hansen were eating lunch on the other side of the shore from the campsite where Breivik attacked. Kids started to run into the water to swim away from the attacker. Once they saw what was happening, they jumped into their boat and collected kids from the water, and took them to the opposite shore to safety. They did four trips and saved 40 kids. They noticed bullet holes in the side of their boat in between trips. Talk About Equality, a gay rights blog, wrote about the story wondering why more major news outlets haven’t picked it up, saying, “Several blogs and gay and lesbian publications are now picking up the story, but the heavy hitters who usually kill for hero stories like this, have remained silent.” 

These ladies should be known as heroes, not as lesbians. 

But they are that—and so here we have another fine example of the downfall of society at the selfish, immoral hands of gaydom. Right?

3 August 2011 ·

British mathematician and pioneering computer scientist Alan Turing was born 99 years ago today, on 23 June 1912. Turing created the method which allowed British codebreakers to crack Nazi Germany’s Enigma cipher, and is widely considered the father of modern computer science; in 1948, for one example, he wrote a chess program which required a computer more powerful than any which yet existed—so he simulated the computer himself in some early trials, taking about 30 minutes per move. His Turing Test, a measure of the ability of an artificial intelligence system to act in a way indistinguishable from a human, remains a crucial concept in AI engineering.
In 1952, Turing reported a break-in at his home by a man named Arthur Murray, with whom he admitted having sexual relations. Both men were charged with “gross indecency,” and Turing was forced to undergo chemical castration in lieu of imprisonment. He died two years later of cyanide poisoning in an apparent suicide, though his family has insisted his death was accidental. In 2009, Prime Minister Gordon Brown issued a formal apology for the government’s handling of the Turing case.  

British mathematician and pioneering computer scientist Alan Turing was born 99 years ago today, on 23 June 1912. Turing created the method which allowed British codebreakers to crack Nazi Germany’s Enigma cipher, and is widely considered the father of modern computer science; in 1948, for one example, he wrote a chess program which required a computer more powerful than any which yet existed—so he simulated the computer himself in some early trials, taking about 30 minutes per move. His Turing Test, a measure of the ability of an artificial intelligence system to act in a way indistinguishable from a human, remains a crucial concept in AI engineering.

In 1952, Turing reported a break-in at his home by a man named Arthur Murray, with whom he admitted having sexual relations. Both men were charged with “gross indecency,” and Turing was forced to undergo chemical castration in lieu of imprisonment. He died two years later of cyanide poisoning in an apparent suicide, though his family has insisted his death was accidental. In 2009, Prime Minister Gordon Brown issued a formal apology for the government’s handling of the Turing case.  

23 June 2011 ·

Curtis Lindsay
Pianist, composer,
expert in nonsense.



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